“Plagiarism in graphic design means the unauthorized use or close imitation of existing artwork and the representation of it as one’s own original work […] Appropriation in art and art history refers to the practice of artists using pre-existing objects or images in their art with little transformation of the original”

~ ethicsingraphicdesign.org

Typography Cool

Someone somewhere called this cover art for New Order’s Confusion 12″ single “typography cool”, which designer Peter Saville was a pioneer of. The color combination represents a code of numbers that corresponds to the letters of the alphabet. One would need the color wheel included on New Order’s 1983 release of the same year Power, Corruption, and Lies for decoding.

New Order Movement Album Cover

Plagiarism or Appropriation?

Although the cover art for Confusion is an exception, Saville was dinged on more than one occasion for his “graphical appropriations” in his other designs for New Order. Take for example the cover art for New Order’s 1981 debut studio album Movement. This is a clear reference to a 1932 poster by Futurist painter Fortunato Depero.

Futurist Poster by Fortunato Depero

Comments from Saville

When asked to comment, Saville explained that it seemed more appropriate to “quote Futurism verbatim rather than parody it ineptly.” By making such an obvious statement about the origins of the Movement design, Saville believed that no one would think he invented it.

Have you heard? Communication is a two way word.

The most remarkable thing about Industry’s Mini LP is the album art. It’s hard not to admire the clear graphical study that has been given to it. What could have otherwise been a simple photograph of the group in period garb has been stripped of it’s essential elements and reduced to pure geometric forms. Cover art designer Norman Moore was perhaps influenced by Piet Mondrian or Theo van Doesburg.

Photo of the band Industry. Circa 1983

“Everything, living or not, is put together from basic building blocks evolving towards consciousness.”

This is a fundamental tenet of Theosophy; a doctrine of religious philosophy which holds that all religions are attempts by the “Spiritual Hierarchy” to help humanity evolve towards perfection. Each religion therefore holds a portion of the truth. Was Moore a Theosophist like his predecessor Mondrian? Unknown. While this remains a fantastic piece of cultural residue from the 1980’s, let me be clear: the music itself is trash.

Notes from the back jacket.

“I started Chinoiseries in August 2006, when I got back from a trip to Viet Nam, the land of my grandparents. As a vinyl junky, I really couldn’t come back to France without bringing back some wax. After hours spent riding on a motorbike in Saigon streets, a taxi finally helped me find some old Asian records. I was feeling like an explorer discovering a forgotten treasure. I bought almost 30 vinyls, most of them in poor condition, went back to the crib, and started making beats with some material that I wasn’t used to.”

U.N.K.L.E. Revival on vinyl, and it feels so nostalgic. Never a good review coming from Pitchfork for these guys. Over and over again, I’ve tried to understand why.
“Alienating some, while inviting others,” it may have read.
“Exciting their core fan base, but really annoying the rest of us,” it may have also read.
Well Burn My Shadow and Surrender Sessions 11-12 were awesome. So, fuck off. Cunt soup.
Admittedly, Pitchfork is actually pretty useful for finding new music, but it becomes increasingly obscure as the days end for this fellow. Someone somewhere is still discovering Pink Floyd, The Doors and Led Zeppelin for the first time. God bless them.

Five well known tracks

Remixed with pulse-pounding amplified authority. Whether hoofing it through the the elements or being wedged between two semi-trailers on the southbound turnpike, this will get you there.

felt-tribute-to-lisa-bonetNot really sure what this album has to do with American Actress Lisa Bonet. Perhaps the TV inside of the Los Angeles hotel room where pre-production for this album was done got stuck on re-runs of The Cosby Show. With nothing better to do besides pound beers and rip butts, Murs, Ant & Slug focused their energy on a linear field of blue micro-dots and started writing. The results? A rejuvenation for those disaffected with the dismal current state of mainstream Hip Hop music.

Three years after DJ Krush released this magnificent self-megamix on Mo’ Wax Records, IBM put forth the intelligently designed Thinkpad X20.

It featured an Intel Pentium III 600 mhz processor with 128mb RAM, and a price tag of $2500. In 2003, a young man living in his Aunt’s garage bought one used for $600. It came pre-formatted with Windows 2000, and crashed after running the first “critical” security update. A friend told him it was like trying to remove the engine from a car while it was still running. For months, he would use this device scour the dark corners of cyber space in search of this glorious album, free of charge. He never did find it, until one day it appeared in the used bin of a basement record store. Score.

Glorious spliff-burnin’ beats from the year 1982 that have nothing to do with the wonderful cover art. Album produced by ‘Junjo’ Lawes. Mixed by the one and only Scientist and vocals backed by the well-known Roots Radics.